Blue and Gold Banquet

The Cub Scout Colors are Blue and Gold.

Blue signifies the sky, truth, spirituality and loyalty.

Gold stands for warm sunlight, good cheer and happiness.


Story of the Cub Scout Colors

Many, many moons ago, the great chief Akela called a council to see what

could be done to make his tribe the best of all tribes.

He told the first Indian brave to climb the mountain and tell the eagle to fly high into

the sky and bring back part of the beauty of the sun.

He told the second brave to go into the forest and tell the sparrow to fly high into

the sky and bring back part of the beauty of the sky.

After a while, both braves returned. One carried a bottle of blue water,

the other a bottle of gold water.

Akela told the first brave to pour some of the beauty of the sun into the council mixing pot. The

brave poured some of the gold water into the pot, causing it to smoke.

He then told the second brave to pour some of the beauty of the sky into the council mixing pot.

The brave poured blue water into the pot, causing smoke.

Chief Akela raised his hands toward the sky.

Akela said, "From this day forward, Blue will stand for truth and loyalty and the sky above. Gold

will stand for warm sunlight, happiness, and good cheer."

Then, Akela reached into the pot and pulled out the Cub Scout neckerchief.

And that's why the Cub Scout colors are Blue and Gold.


The Scouts BSA (formly known as Boy Scouts of America) was organized in February 1910 and the Cub Scout program was organized 20 years later, in 1930. February is also the birth month of Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting. This is why most blue and gold banquets are celebrated in the month of February. To honor the birth of scouting and the birth of its founder.

Blue and gold banquets are a tradition within packs, celebrating the leaders and parents who volunteer to make Cub Scouting fantastic. Sometimes former pack members return to blue and gold banquets. Often special Scouting or community leaders are invited to attend or speak to Cub Scouts in attendance. Some packs also use the banquet as a chance to celebrate the accomplishments of Scouts, themselves.

Pack 156 uses this banquet as a celebration....of Cub Scouts, Scouts BSA and our pack family!